blog, Community, Knitting, Knitting Projects, Skills, Socks, Sweaters, Thursday Tips, Whats on My Needles, Wool, Yarn

Final Measurements

Hey Everyone!

While I was working on the first sock of my regal pair of socks, I had remembered something I had learned while working at the studio. 

This tip is: let the garment/item you are knitting shrink up before taking final measurements. 

I.E. the sock I am working on needs to be 5.25 inches from the heel flap to where I will start the toe. Once it measures 5.25 inches while knitting, I let it sit until the next day, then measure it again (it is typically a bit shorter than it was while I was working on it the day before), and then I knit up the remainder I need, before knitting the toe. I make sure it is the right length once it has shrunk to final size (as it is looser while knitting), before moving on. 

While I was working at the studio, we had to check the pieces against the final dimensions and against the other pieces of the same size to ensure consistency. 

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Knitting, Skills

Important Life Skills Learned from Knitting

Hey Everyone! 

Yesterday, I had one of my sock needles snap on me. I needed this needle, to be in one piece so I could continue working on my socks. 

While I would love to have multiple sets of the size needle that I prefer for using with the KnitPicks Palette Yarn, I am not in a place to purchase multiple sets at the moment. So I needed to figure out how to make it work. First I tried packing tape, that didn’t work out to well. My second attempt worked much better. I used Super Glue and some scotch tape, and that did the trick, so for now I am back in sock knitting business. 

Knitting, while it is something I am passionate about, and a favorite pass time of mine, it has also taught me valuable life skills. Through the process of learning to knit, and different projects I have knit up, as well as when things happened I have learned so much. I have learned:

Patience: knitting anything takes time, it doesn’t do itself or happen overnight. 

Perseverance: You have to stick with it to be able to make beautiful projects. Learning new things and now styles and stitches takes time, persistence, and the determination to not give up, because it will get easier the more times you do it. 

An “I can Fix It” mentality: sometimes you will have to frog 🐸 a project, or have a spot you have to go back to and fix something that went wrong. Sometimes it just didn’t turn out right, and to make it look nice you have to go back and reknit it. Or, your needle breaks and you can’t afford to replace it, so you take super glue and scotch tape and make it good as new so you can keep working. 

Those are just a few things that knitting has taught me. 

Knitting, Skills, Socks, Wool, Yarn, Yarn Reviews

Yarn Review: Viking of Norway Nordlys Yarn

Hey Everyone!

It’s been a while since I have done a yarn review. 

I am not usually a person who rails on companies with negatively, unless there is a good reason. Even if a yarn isn’t my favorite, I will state that, and that it is solely my opinion. 

Though, I am currently working with a yarn, knitting socks, that is complete and utter rubbish. I will preface this, with saying that this was the first “sock yarn” I had ever bought, ever before I figured out how to knit socks. Big mistake #1 was buying the yarn at an actual fabric store, mistake #2 was not researching before I spent the money on it. I live in a state where we don’t have sales tax, and I spent $14.99 on it, when in other places I saw was under $8. 

So I bought a skein of Viking or Norway nordlys sock yarn. Let me say this; it’s not real sock yarn, it is Chinese slubby rubbish. 


I have been knitting for almost 20 years, and used way more types of yarn than I can remember. This yarn is the second worse yarn I have ever used. The worst yarn I have ever used has been was some Chinese “cashmere”. Who knows how much actual cashmere it actually is. 

Casting on the first sock, had to be done 3 or 4 times, as the fibers kept pulling apart. This yarn is a loose roving, not a proper yarn, and there have been 5 or 6 larger extremely loosely spun, and have almost pulled apart. This yarn is a slubby yarn. Slubby Yarn is a yarn where the thickness of the yarn changes consistency throughout the strand, that is what this yarn is doing. 

I am extremely perturbed by this yarn. I spent about 3 times as much as I do for enough KnitPicks Palette Yarn to make a pair of socks, for Yarn that is of a greatly inferior quality. 

I will never buy another skein of any Viking of Norway brand Yarn again. Why waste the money for rubbish yarn, when I can get better quality of yarn for less money? 

blog, Friday Night Knit Night, Knitting, Personal Project Friday, Skills, Socks, Wool, Yarn, Yarn Reviews

The Knitter’s Notes Instagram

Hey Everyone!

I had been toying with the idea for a while of making a dedicated “The Knitter’s Notes” Instagram page. For a little while I was posting my knitting stuff on my “Simple Homemaking” page, and I may still post some things there as well as to the knitter’s notes page. Now I have an instagram dedicated to my Knitting pictures. I also wanted to get it, to make sure no one else claimed “The Knitter’s Notes” on Instagram. This way, my blog, Instagram, and Facebook Page all have the same title. It is definitely easier to have them all the same thing than have to explain why one is different because I didn’t claim it first. 

Today, I have been working on my Hazelnut colored socks, while watching the Animal Adventure Park giraffe live feed, as April is supposed to be having her calf in the very near future. I have been watching the live feed on and off since mid February. Waiting on a giraffe to give birth is like watching the paint dry. 

Now that I am back to working with Palette Yarn, I didn’t know how much I liked it, until after working with a yarn so difficult that the tension I was having to put in my little needles snapped one of them in two. 

Of the wool sock yarn I have, I have two skeins that are not the KnitPicks Palette Yarn, which I hope will Knit up ok. Though the vast majority of my wool sock yarn I currently have is the KnitPicks Palette Yarn, in various colors. I will definitely be posting pictures and blog posts about them. 

I am really loving the Hazelnut color of Palette yarn. It’s definitely a brown, but it has more of an orangey red tone to it. It is really pretty. It also goes really well with the color “Victorian” which I would say is a bright dusty rose color. 

With as much of the Victorian I have in my stash as well as the Hazelnut I will have left over, I will hopefully be able to get two pairs of Victorian socks and a pair of Victorian & Hazelnut socks. 

The Palette yarn works up pretty fast and I really haven’t had any issues with it, which is good, beings that I am just getting started on the roughly 4 dozen pairs of socks I will be making with it. 

Knitting, Pattern Friday, Skills, Social Media, Socks, Wool, Yarn, Yarn Store

Why I Don’t Sell on Etsy

Hey Everyone!

Over the years, I have gotten a lot of people tell me something along the lines of “you should sell on Etsy” or “selling what you make on Etsy should be your career”, or “you could make a living on etsy”. I know they mean well, but I always hear it from non knitters, and at this point I tell them that for someone like me to sell on etsy, I would lose money on everything I sell, just to get it sold. 

I will use a pair of socks for example, using KnitPicks Palette Yarn, that I had bought enough of to get free shipping and had paid full price. For an average woman’s foot, to get a pair of socks, I need one and a part of a second ball, so I buy two of every color I want to use, for a single pair of socks. Then I also have to factor in the electricity I use while knitting up the socks, as well as the cost of the wool wash, the water, and electricity to wash and dry the socks, then cost of shipping materials, the cost of shipping and the labor from the time I start the socks, to completing them, washing them, drying them, taking the pictures, posting it on Etsy, packing them up to ship, and then shipping the items, would take a good 50 – 60 hours. 

So let me break it down for you in the numbers:

Cost to post an item to my etsy shop: $.20

Cut etsy takes from price items sell for: 3.5%

Cost for two balls of KnitPicks Palette Yarn (based on having an order over $50 to qualify for free shipping) – $6.98

Electric bill allocation for electricity used while working on each project: $20

Water & Sewer usage to wash a pair of socks – $5

Shipping materials: $5+

Shipping: $5+

60 hours of labor at $15 an hour – $900

So in order to take a living off of selling socks on Etsy, I would have to charge, roughly $990.47 plus shipping for a pair of socks.

I don’t care who you are, and what your budget is, or the fact that they are a good quality sock, no one is going to pay roughly $1000 for a pair of socks, but that is why I would have to charge to make a living off of selling what I make on Etsy. That is why I don’t sell on Etsy, I know i can’t make a living that way off selling what I make. 

Not to mention dealing with small business taxes, and that is a definite deal breaker for me. I am the creative one, not the numbers one. 

Knitting, Knitting Essentials, Skills, Socks, Wool, Yarn

My January KnitPicks order arrived!

Hey Everyone!

A week ago I had ordered some Yarn from KnitPicks. It finally arrived today! I ordered more of the KnitPicks Palette Yarns in 11 different colors. I have been anxiously awaiting this order and had been checking the tracking multiple times a day to see where it was in the trip from Ohio. 


While there are a couple of lighter colors, this round of sock yarn purchased just reinforced my love for darker and natural colors. Especially for socks that I plan to use for boot socks for hiking, I prefer the neutral / natural colors, and more foresty/outdoorsy colors. 

I am currently working on my first pair of socks using the Palette Yarn. It is working up really nicely, and is super soft, which I was not expecting beings that it is 100% Wool. 

I had also ordered a set of blocking boards and some T pins, for when I need to block items I have knit up and subsequently washed, in order to shape them while damp, then let them dry in that shape so the garment will better hold its shape. 

Until I had started making items for myself, I had never blocked anything, but now that I have knit items for myself and blocked them, I love it and finally understand the point of it. 


The blocking boards look and act like puzzle pieces, they easily connect and hold together well which is important when trying to block an item, so they won’t slide and misalign as I am pinning whatever project I am blocking to the boards. They are slightly squishy, and will help repel water. 

Knitting, Knitting Projects, Patterns, Personal Projects, Projects for Myself, Skills, Socks, Yarn

Creating my own Sock Pattern!

Hey Everyone! 

I am super excited that I finally finished typing up my own basic knit socks pattern! I built my pattern off swatch testing yarns to figure out gauge and figure out what size needles to use, as well as other patterns to get a rough idea of how many stitches to cast on. Length of cuff and heel flap came from working in the first sock, and I used a tutorial for turning the heel, the gusset and decreasing the toe. I kept comparing the sock against my foot to get the length of the sock correct. 

I finally typed up all the pieces of information I had written down on post it notes and from the blog tutorial I used for the heel, gusset & toe. Now I have it all in the same document and looking nice and easy to use, going forward for more socks. 

This is the first sock I knit up using what has become my sock pattern:


I really like how it turned out. 

I have a fair amount of sock yarn that I am excited to finally get to use for socks, including some wool that I am wanting to use for socks. This wool is KnitPicks Palette yarn, which is super soft, and I am hoping it will be durable, and last a while.